What does vitamin B7 (biotin) do in the body?

Vitamin B7, also known as biotin, is a cofactor (necessary substance to activate molecules/enzymes) in many different enzyme systems necessary for energy production, cell growth, production of fatty acids, and the metabolism of fats and amino acids. It plays a primary role in all of our cells’ energy production by being an integral player in the citric acid cycle where biochemical energy is generated as we breathe. Full biotin deficiency is rare because in healthy persons our intestinal bacteria produce it in excess of the body's daily requirements, which are only about 30-100mcgs/day. For anyone marginally deficient, as some populations can be, such as athletes maintaining low body fat, active dieters, and pregnant women, a daily multivitamin and mineral formula (MVM) containing 100-300mcgs (higher end for active people) of biotin can adequately fill the gap.

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